Joel Gill MA (Cantab) MSc FGS

Founder/Director, Geology for Global Development
PhD Researcher, King's College London
Class Teacher, London School of Economics and Political Science

Overview: My core work focuses on increasing the effective application of geology to international development, supporting the fight against global poverty. I aim to integrate both physical and social science techniques within both my practitioner work and research. I currently have field experience in Chile, China, Guatemala, India, Tanzania and Uganda, working in the disciplines of both water and natural hazards.

Current Research: My PhD research aims to increase our understanding and the characterisation of natural hazard interactions (e.g., one hazard triggering another hazard), so as to improve multi-hazard risk assessments.
The challenge of cross-disciplinary communication and integration into stakeholder communities will also be addressed through the development of innovative ways of visualising natural hazards and their interactions. Objectives include: (i) complete a broad review, classification and visualisation of possible natural hazard interactions; (ii) consider how anthropic processes (e.g., groundwater abstraction trigger natural hazards or catalyse natural hazard interactions; (iii) analyse and characterise networks of interacting hazards from multiple past case studies; (iv) undertake fieldwork in Guatemala to evaluate potential hazard interactions and contrast various knowledge worlds (scientific literature, local residents, local hazard professionals).

Teaching Experience:
- Class Teacher (geohazards and disaster risk reduction), Environment: Science and Society, Department of Geography and Environment, London School of Economics.
- Class Assistant (mineralogy and petrology), Methods in Physical Geography (Yr 2), Department of Geography, King's College London.
- Guest Lecturer (multihazard assessments), Advanced Natural Hazards (Yr 3), Department of Geography, King's College London.

Publications:
Gill, J. C., and B. D. Malamud (2014), Reviewing and visualizing the interactions of natural hazards, Rev. Geophys., 52, doi:10.1002/2013RG000445. (Open Access).

Further Information: